What is a MOOC?

Compared with conventional courses that charge tuition, issue college credit, and have enrollments of 20 to 30 students, MOOCs are free and do not issue credits to participants (Pappano, 2012). Since anyone with an Internet connection can register, enrollments can be enormous, occasionally numbering into the thousands (Rodriguez, 2012). Due to the large number of students, faculty cannot respond to each student individually. Students work collaboratively in study groups organized into online forums. The primary instructional medium is the video lecture. Assignments, homework, tests, and final exams may also be included.

Rodriguez (2012) studied an artificial intelligence (AI) MOOC given at the University of Stanford that had an enrollment of 160,000 students. The MOOC was taught by Sebastian Thrun and Peter Norvig, two leading experts on AI (Rodriguez 2012). The MOOC was an experiment by the Stanford University computer science department to increase technology and innovation education worldwide. Norvig and Thrun issued a certificate of accomplishment to students who completed the course (Rodriguez, 2012). The Stanford University computer science department caused a controversy in higher education with their participation in a MOOC that drew an unexpectedly large number of students taught by two of the world’s leading experts on AI (Conole, 2013). Conole (2013) noted that the AI MOOC controversy caused higher education to investigate new methods of developing online courses that would not only make more effective use of technology but also would attract a more diverse student body due to technology. Jenkins (2009) cautioned that students participating in MOOCs needed to possess adequate technology and literacy skills to find and use information effectively as is often present in connectivist learning theory. Continue reading “What is a MOOC?”

NEW PODCAST “WPS TECH TALK” NOW AVAILABLE ON SOUNDCLOUD

WILMINGTON, January 11, 2017 – Director of Technology, Dr. Anne-Marie Fiore announced that the new WPS TECH TALK podcast will be available on Sound Cloud. WPS TECH TALK will provide listeners with an insight into digital learning in the public schools of Wilmington, Massachusetts. The first episode featured information on the elementary library and technology program.

Podcast host Dr. Anne-Marie Fiore says, “Providing high-quality engaging, personalized instruction is central to our vision and mission in the Wilmington Public Schools.  Digital learning and technology integration are key to achieving our vision and critical to meeting the needs of diverse learners.  We are so fortunate to have teachers who are leading the way, here in Wilmington.”

Fans of the podcast can contact Anne-Marie Fiore via email (annemarie.fiore@wpsk12.com) to provide feedback and ideas for the podcast.

To listen to the podcast, visit https://soundcloud.com/wctvpodcasting/sets/wilmington-public-school-tech

About the Wilmington Public Schools

The Wilmington Public Schools is a high-performing district where all students are provided opportunities to learn through high-quality, rigorous curriculum and engaging, personalized instruction delivered in a safe, supportive, inclusive environment.  All members of our school community work together to develop confident, empathetic, life-long learners and responsible citizens.  Our students become innovative, creative, collaborative problem-solvers capable of making positive contributions to society.

For more information, contact Anne-Marie Fiore at annemarie.fiore@wpsk12.com or visit the official website: http://www.wpsk12.com

Shifting Teaching and Learning – Digital and Blended Learning

Try Answer Garden: https://answergarden.ch/

Shifting Teaching and Learning
Shifting Teaching and Learning

Blended learning enables important shifts in teaching and learning as schools move to a more student-centered, personalized approach. This session will address the why,what, where and how of the shifts in curriculum and instruction and  provides school leaders with an understanding of new opportunities for personalization and for addressing learning differences;  powerful applications of project-based, game-based and universal design for learning with technology;  options for and affordances of digital curriculum and connected learning; and important new ways to think about the use of student learning time.

Continue reading “Shifting Teaching and Learning – Digital and Blended Learning”

Passive Learning VS Active Learning with Technology.

Content Consumption to Content Creation: Shift the Flow

Passive VS Active Learning with Technology
Passive VS Active Learning with Technology

Below is a good graphic illustrating the difference between passive and active learning with technology. The graphic is from the National Educational Technology Plan 2016. Ask yourself if you are;

  1. assigning digitized worksheets to your students
  2. encouraging your students to consume media? (e. g. reading online or watching videos

Numbers 1 and 2 above are examples of passive learning with technology. If you employ active learning with technology, your students will:

  1. interact with experts
  2. be a part of a global community (http://www.globalkidsconnect.org/global-citizen/)
  3. create media rich productions/projects
  4. code and program
  5. collaborate with their peers
  6. use simulations and games

Continue reading “Passive Learning VS Active Learning with Technology.”

School Culture and Digital Learning

School Culture
School Culture

Try Kahoot: http://kahoot.it/

Creating a Culture for Digital Learning

  • Identify a time where you felt empowered as a member of a team moving toward a common goal.
  • Create a list of characteristics of the team culture that supported this environment.
  • Once you have your list of characteristics, ask yourself or your team members the following questions:
  • Are these characteristics present in your school culture?
  • Do you feel your teachers would respond differently?
  • How do you know trust is evident in your building?
  • How do you build trust?

ACTIVITY: Build your own definition of school culture. Continue reading “School Culture and Digital Learning”