Steps Needed For Putting Social Media For Authentic Learning Into Action.

In this post, we will explore several types of technology, including social media used for learning, blogs, and wikis. We need to remember that although blogs and wikis, in some cases, predated social media, they are considered a part of social media.

When integrating social media to support authentic learning in the classroom or learning situation, we must first define what authentic learning experiences are. Authentic learning experiences are created around real-life, genuine purposes. They engage students in critical thinking and twenty-first-century learning, teach important skills such as research and collaboration, and improve student learning. Authentic learning can rely on technology to develop typical scenarios that learners encounter in real-world settings. Online authentic learning experiences often integrate asynchronous and synchronous communication and social media for teamwork, including collaborative online investigations, resource sharing and knowledge construction. Social media tools, such as blogs and wikis, can help learners find a broader community where they can share information and resources.

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Plugged into Curriculum Development

Being plugged into curriculum development compels one to examine emerging theory in current curricular development, but we have to examine the whole picture in recent education. We have seen educators customize and individualize curriculum according to needs of all students. In many instances, we have seen new assessments (next generation computerized assessments) and other technological resources (adoptino of iPads) being instituted. In addition, we have seen an emphasis on skills over facts in curriculum design. We will explore how emerging trends in curriculum development are demonstrated in specific subject or content areas.

In the K12 arena, English language arts (ELA), reading, or writing (literacy); social studies; mathematics; science; foreign language; the arts; and physical and health education make up what is frequently known as the “common curriculum”.  The common curriculum is what is usually taught in schools everywhere.

How might you as a curriculum developer anticipate a future trend in a subject or content area? How would you identify a political, economic, or other social factor (e.g., wellness’ effect on physical education and health) that has the potential for re-shaping a subject area? How you would identify technology or another outside influence that might affect a subject or content area (e.g., virtual and augmented reality)? Some trends in the given subject areas can be found below:

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How To Attract Your Students With Virtual and Augmented Realities

In classroom across the world, educators are exploring how virtual and augmented realities have found their way into classroom enhancing the traditional learning environments by blurring the physical and digital world. In addition to creating comprehensive, rigorous, and coherent curriculum, educators also created a personalized and motivating learning environment for every student. Reducing the gap between the real and digital world makes the learning environment more flexible and adaptive.

Virtual reality and augmented reality have the potential to transform the way educators communicate with students, the way educators attract students to learning. But where do we start? With so many devices, information, and experiences available on the internet, virtual and augmented technologies can be overwhelming.
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Courting Adult Learners in Higher Education

What adult learners need from traditional colleges and universities.

Although i have a doctoral degree in education, I decided that I wanted to get an MFA in Creative Writing. I had two criterion at the start of my search.  I wanted a wholly online degree program. I wanted a Massachusetts state school (I am an adjunct professor), because I will would hopefully be eligible for a discount on tuition. A wholly online degree program for an MFA in Creative Writing is not to be found in Massachusetts. Framingham State University came the closest but there were English requirements that were courses only available during the day and at the university.

I did not think that my quest for an online MFA in creative writing was unusual, so I started to search in other states. I guess I could pay full tuition. Program after program, I could not find an online MFA in creative writing. There were many reasons that the programs were not wholly online. One of the reasons was that “in-seat” time was required was because of guest lecturers that were famous or successful authors. Fair enough. I guess I would not mind sitting in a class where the guest lecturer was James Patterson or maybe even President Bill Clinton (he’s a fiction writer, now), https://www.amazon.com/President-Missing-Novel-James-Patterson/dp/0316412694 

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